Tugging against the leash of strength progression

 It can challenge the motivation of any lifter to follow the restrictions of an intelligent program. 

It can challenge the motivation of any lifter to follow the restrictions of an intelligent program. 

Saturday is my max effort lower body day while I’m training for my first full powerlifting meet. I squat first and deadlift after that, my weeks alternate between heavier squats and heavier deadlifts. I was working up to a heavy double, in the 90% range of my one rep max. I nailed it and it was not as difficult as I had anticipated. This left me feeling hungry for more, as I usually am on Saturdays. Although it’s my favourite training day, it always leaves something to be desired. I struggle with holding back. I find that I have an incessant desire to always go bigger, go heavier, try more.

I have been training for years, actually most people have and that would influence anyone to think they understand what their limits are. But as I have come into competitive powerlifting as a newbie, I have been told what all newbies are told; which is that constantly testing your strength is not conducive to building it. My problem is that is so fucking satisfying to try to outdo myself each week and I realize I am not the only one to experience this dilemma.

This one of the things that powerlifting has taught me which is applicable outside of the sport. Powerlifting helps train the brain to understand the benefits of long term and consistent progress by way of delaying instant gratification. I have found my best progress so far has been made by sticking to a plan and building my strength and building my technique week after week. I still enjoy trying to outdo myself each week but overdoing would only lead to a decrease in strength.  

I am sure I am not the only one who struggles with this concept and is constantly wanting to test their new strength or try to rush the process of building strength. We would love to hear your input with regards to your own struggles and solutions in training.